WHAT IS GENDER EQUALITY AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

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Recognising and being inclusive of all employees has demonstrated benefits to businesses. In the context of the Transport and Logistics Industry, the low representation of women employees means that a strong focus is being placed on strategies specifically to support and increase the numbers of women in our workforce.

The Workplace Gender Equality Agency advocates that the aim of gender equality in the workplace is to achieve broadly equal outcomes for women and men. The Agency states that gender equality is achieved when people are able to access and enjoy the same rewards, resources and opportunities regardless of whether they are a woman or a man – not exactly the same outcome for all individuals. 

Women represent approximately 14 per cent of the industry workforce (E-Scan 2014).  It is evident that inequity and career barriers continue to be an issue for women in the Transport and Logistics industry, as demonstrated by the decline in the number of women employed in the sector in the last decade despite previous years of strong growth.

 

Year% of women in T & L
19669.9%
197612.5%
198617.5%
199825.5%
200924%

 

 

www.skillsinfo.gov.au/skills/industryprofiles/IndustryRegionalTables.htm

 

Recent research undertaken by the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council also cites a corresponding decrease in the strategies used by employers to increase the number of women in the workforce. Clearly, the benefits and opportunities for attracting and retaining women are not being fully embraced (T&LISC, E-Scan 2013).

As with many industries, Transport and Logistics is increasingly facing workforce challenges such as retiring personnel and difficulty attracting skilled workers. Given the increasing labour demand, combined with the fact that females make up approximately 45% of the general workforce in Australia, there is a clear opportunity for greater inclusion and utilisation of women in Transport and Logistics.